Answer to Question #12042 Submitted to "Ask the Experts"

Category: Medical and Dental Equipment/Shielding — Shielding

The following question was answered by an expert in the appropriate field:

Q

While performing portable x rays, do we need to provide thyroid shields to the comforters, particularly in pediatric wards where parents or nurses have to hold the children during exposures?

A

Though not a requirement, it would be a good idea to give people a thyroid collar along with a lead apron when they are holding patients during x-ray examinations. Many countries try to keep radiation doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). If thyroid collars are available, or if they are integrated into the actual lead apron, it makes sense to wear one. If the facility does not have any thyroid collars, however, the apron itself is sufficient.

Another recommendation is to get a family member, as opposed to a health care worker (other x-ray technologist, nurse, etc.), to hold patients. This will avoid having the same person regularly hold patients. Also, the person holding the patient should be an adult (i.e., over 18 years old).

Kennith "Duke" Lovins, CHP

Ask the Experts is posting answers using only SI (the International System of Units) in accordance with international practice. To convert these to traditional units we have prepared a conversion table. You can also view a diagram to help put the radiation information presented in this question and answer in perspective. Explanations of radiation terms can be found here.
Answer posted on 25 June 2017. The information posted on this web page is intended as general reference information only. Specific facts and circumstances may affect the applicability of concepts, materials, and information described herein. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice. To the best of our knowledge, answers are correct at the time they are posted. Be advised that over time, requirements could change, new data could be made available, and Internet links could change, affecting the correctness of the answers. Answers are the professional opinions of the expert responding to each question; they do not necessarily represent the position of the Health Physics Society.