Answer to Question #7305 Submitted to "Ask the Experts"

Category: Radiation Safety Careers

The following question was answered by an expert in the appropriate field:

Q

I am well aware that MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) technologists do not work with radiation, but I am a registered x-ray/mammography technologist and I'm searching for information on training in the MRI field. I've not found any schools or specialty classes in MRI in my area (New Jersey) and was wondering what, if any, certifications or training were required for MRI technologists?

A

Thank you for your question. I checked with a couple of our MR supervisors here. They said that most of the regular x-ray technology schools have some basic coursework in the radiology specialty areas (CT, ultrasound, MR). There also are one-year programs that specialize in MR for the person who is already a certified x-ray technologist. One such program is in California—MRI Technology Program; others can be found by contacting the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists or doing an online search.

There apparently is also an MR certification that an x-ray technologist can sit for that is from the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). The individual must have at least one year's worth of training after the x-ray technology program before taking it. The ARRT website might help you with this.

Kelly Classic
Certified Medical Health Physicist
 

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Answer posted on 11 March 2008. The information posted on this web page is intended as general reference information only. Specific facts and circumstances may affect the applicability of concepts, materials, and information described herein. The information provided is not a substitute for professional advice and should not be relied upon in the absence of such professional advice. To the best of our knowledge, answers are correct at the time they are posted. Be advised that over time, requirements could change, new data could be made available, and Internet links could change, affecting the correctness of the answers. Answers are the professional opinions of the expert responding to each question; they do not necessarily represent the position of the Health Physics Society.